Find A Formula For The Function Whose Graph Is Given 5 Tips to Help You Structure Your Presentation

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5 Tips to Help You Structure Your Presentation

This article is the last in a series of three devoted to presentation.

The previous article dealt with overcoming presentation jitters by understanding the three sources of presentation anxiety. If you missed it, you can find it under the heading “3 Top Reasons We Get Nervous About Presentations.”

The second article looked at presentation delivery techniques with five tips to help you stand up and speak with confidence. It’s titled “5 Tips to Help You Present with Confidence”.

In this third and final article on the topic of presentation challenges, I’m focusing on how to structure your slides and your talk for maximum impact.

I’m dealing with presentation structure last because, for most of us, it’s the aspect of public speaking that’s most challenging. That being said, a dull slide pack represents a challenge even for a talented speaker. So here are five tips to help you design your conversation to enhance rather than detract from it.

Tip #1: Use images the right way!

In terms of the type of visuals I recommend you invest in for an important presentation, I suggest you stay away from clipart that just doesn’t look professional and polished enough. Copyright free images are available on many sites but they may lack the luster of paid images. If you find a powerful image, hide it A corner of your slide: Make sure it is prominent in the location. It can cover an entire slide with text above. Or, give it your half slide for good measure.

Many of us use our slides as speaker notes and so they are filled with text which makes the slide very unattractive. If you need reminders, use actual notes, cue cards or a teleprompter but not your slides. Get your main message across. Build strong distinctions between text and images, text and data charts, and images and graphs. If you don’t, your audience will spend some time trying to figure out what the slide’s message is but will quickly struggle, lose patience and… give up!

Slide design is not the same as slide decoration so watch the font types and sizes, as well as the use of colors (or will your slide resemble a geographic map). Good slide design is simple. It looks fantastic, effortless. And speaks loudly.

Did you know that people only remember 10% of what they hear but 65% of what they see and hear? That’s why slides are important as the right kind of complement to your presentation.

Tip #2: Tell stories

In a previous article on how to confidently deliver your presentation, I encouraged you to tap into and bring out the animated self you become when you’re talking about a topic you’re passionate about. And when you’re communicating, you’re usually telling a story. Storytelling is the way we humans communicate most of the time. Stories resonate: A story helps you communicate even in a setting that doesn’t seem like it and establishes a connection with your audience.

Stories are wonderful because they allow you to:

  • Establish your credibility without boasting,

  • Show Success If success is about overcoming the challenges your audience faces,

  • Add humor without being weird. It’s not a disaster if no one laughs: it’s just part of the story! and

  • Raise controversial issues slowly.

I read that “presentations are cutting edge but Stories are the kingdom of the heart“In fact, even sleepy listeners will get excited when you say, ‘I’ll tell you about the time this happened.’

Tip #3: Ask questions

Most people I work with in presentations know that it’s usually a good idea to let the audience ask questions as the presentation opens because it keeps the audience engaged which brings life to the proceedings. However, very few ask their audience questions. There are two types of questions in a presentation speech: rhetorical questions and substantive questions. A rhetorical question is one you don’t expect an answer to. For example, you might ask “Did you know?” You can introduce the slide with When we use the question mode, we raise our voice at the end of the sentence and it grabs our audience’s attention so questions are useful. Keeping the flow of your speech varied rather than monotone.

Genuine questions serve many purposes but let me flag just one here: you Create a feedback loop. If your presentation is about raising awareness about the world’s lack of clean water, you can hit your audience with both heart-wrenching stories as well as hard-core data to prove your point. And when you’re doing that, how do you know if it’s working, if your stories and data are reaching them? Well, ask. So show them the glass slide and then ask: “Are you shocked by this piece of data?” If you’ve got lots of heads and wide eyes, you know your emotional approach will be effective.

Tip #4: ‘Prepare’ Your Points

Since most of us attend work and business contexts, let me share with you a formula to help you structure your ideas when structuring your presentation slides and overall talk.

PREP = point – reason – example – point

Here’s how to use ‘PREP’:

  • the point – You make your point like ‘speaking can boost your career’.
  • the reason – You explain that people who talk are perceived as competent and intelligent.
  • Example – You share that David Jones has just been promoted for the second time this year. He talks a lot – but he’s more capable than any of us (note: hypothetical example).
  • the point – You make your point again that ‘speaking can boost your career’.

Go ahead and let me know if PREP worked for you!

Tip #4: Oreo-cookie your presentation

Building on the ‘PREP’ that applies to the individual points you make in your presentation, let me close by offering a simple yet powerful presentation structure as follows:

1. Set the scene

2. Share your key message

3. Make your marks

4. Share your key message

In this setup, each point you assert is clearly made twice as per ‘PREP’ and supported by an example that provides clarification and evidence. You need to order your points in some fashion—maybe chronologically, maybe building intensity. The bottom line is that all your points support it A key message that you will share twice – Hence consistency with the Oreo cookie image and ‘PREP’ approach. The structure is also simple so you won’t lose your audience! It might look a bit dull but give it a try and see how it helps you build a powerful presentation!

There you have it. To structure your presentation for impact, be sure to use images in the right way relative to the text on display, share stories and ask questions, and use a simple structure to make points that back up your overall presentation and your main message. Do you think it might benefit you?

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