Excel Macro And Setting A If Formula Into A Cell Access Visual Basic and Excel VBA Macros – A Comparison of the MS Office Programming Languages

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Access Visual Basic and Excel VBA Macros – A Comparison of the MS Office Programming Languages

Similarities between Excel VBA and Access VBA

In theory it should be easy to switch from one MS Office VBA programming language to another, as all the basic principles are the same. Even if you’re not writing VBA macros within Access, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, or Word, you’re still using:

– Objects, collections, methods and properties

– variable (DIM statement)

– IF conditions and loops

– Message boxes and input boxes

– Subroutines and functions

In fact, objects and collections defined within an application are different. So how difficult can it be to switch from Excel VBA to Access VBA? The answer, unfortunately, is… quite difficult. Here’s why!

The difference between Excel Visual Basic and Access Visual Basic

The main differences between the two programming languages ​​are that Access supports two macro languages, does not support recording, has two different ways to create Visual Basic macros, hides much of its functionality in a DoCmd object, and has two separate object models. If that doesn’t make much sense, don’t worry—the rest of this article will explain each of these points in turn.

Access has two macro languages

This is a red herring. There are two different languages ​​for writing macros in Microsoft Access: one is called macroAnother called modules or Visual Basic. If you have any knowledge of VBA, you should ignore the first one; It is intended for people with no programming experience, and does not support proper looping, error-handling and many other constructs. Although the Access Database window includes a MACROS tab, you should ignore it completely!

Access does not support recording

Want to know how to paint a cell red with pink spots in Excel? If you can’t guess the macro command (unlikely), you can simply record a macro and take a look at the resulting code. This is an important helpful reminder even if you are a VBA guru.

Access, on the other hand, does not support recording – not even in the latest version at the time of writing, Access 2010. This is a shame to say the least (interestingly, while Word supports VBA recording, PowerPoint does not. t any more: Microsoft removed the feature after version 2007). This means that you are often forced to resort to Google, Microsoft Help or calling a friend to do something in Access VBA.

Two different ways to write macros in Access

Want to create a VBA macro in Access? To do this, you need to go to the VBA code editor. Surprisingly, you can do this in two different ways: either press ALT + F11 normally, or click. modules Tab to the Database window and choose to create a new module. Why are there two different ways to do the same thing? Historical reasons, we think.

Access uses the DoCmd object for many commands

Access VBA is complicated (or simplified?) by the fact that almost half of the commands start with DoCmd. For example:

DoCmd.OpenForm – To open the form

DoCmd.Maximize – To maximize a window

Features like these make Excel a more logical programming language than Access.

Access has two separate object models

Excel is pretty self-contained (although if you’re creating your own dialog boxes, you’ll use a separate application called Microsoft Forms). Access, however, divided into two roughly equal parts:

– Tables and queries are part of the Access database engine

– Forms, reports, macros, and modules are part of a Microsoft Access application

Although you’ll only hit this complexity when you get to advanced programming in Access, this is another Access feature to muddy the VBA waters.

In summary, then, we would like to say that Excel macros are more straightforward than Access. Add to that the fact that it’s much faster to learn Excel than it is to learn Access, and you get two uneven learning curves!

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