Excel Countifs Formula To Look For Value In Multiple Columns COUNTIF and SUMIF Formulas in Microsoft Excel

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COUNTIF and SUMIF Formulas in Microsoft Excel

Excel provides two simple built-in formulas to solve calculations and summations in rows or columns based on criteria you establish. The formulas discussed in this article are COUNTIF and SUMIF.

COUNTIF

This formula will analyze data in a range that includes a single row or column, or adjacent rows or columns. For example, you can analyze the data in the column defined by A1:A20, or you are looking at A1:B20. Any range is acceptable to use for the COUNTIF function. The form of the formula is:

=COUNTIF(range, criteria).

Let’s say, for example, that you are interested in determining the total number of sales in a region, defined as North, South, East, and West regions, and you have daily sales for each region for a five-day period. The first step is to determine how many sales exceed 30 units per day in a five-day period. Let’s further assume that our field names are in the range C6:C9 of the corresponding unit data in D6:H9. The formula to find sales of more than 30 units would be =COUNTIF(D6:D9,”>30″). It will give you the right answer. Note that in this function, part of the parameter needs to be in quotes. You can link to that cell, such as with the formula =COUNTIF(D6:D9,A6), where cell A6 can contain =”>30″. Sometimes, linking to another cell provides more flexibility in the financial model, especially if you are doing a quick sensitivity analysis.

The COUNTIF function has some flexibility to perform calculations based on wildcards, such as creating the parameters “*py” to find all words ending in “py” or “*py*” containing “py” and so on. There are advanced standards that will be covered in my blog, but for now, we want to keep it simple.

A major drawback of the COUNTIF function is that it can only take a single parameter to analyze. So, if you want to determine all unit sales over 30 and within the North area, you would have to do a formula like the following:

=SUM(IF(C6:C9=”Answer”,(IF(D6:H9>30,1,0),0)).

In this case, you have to use Ctrl+Shift+Enter to get the correct answer (this is array formula entry, which is more advanced than the purpose of this article, but necessary for your understanding). This formula will tell you how many days over 30 units were sold in North region in five days analysis.

SUMIF

The SUMIF formula is similar to the COUNTIF formula in its constraints, only being able to evaluate a specific criterion. The form of this function is: =SUMIF(Range, Criterion, Sum_Range).

Let’s say you need to know the total of all unit sales during a five-day period in which unit sales exceed 30 days. The formula will be:

=SUMIF(D6:H6,”>30″,D6:H6).

It literally divides by looking at the range defined by D6:H6, finding all values ​​greater than 30, and then summing those values ​​within the range of D6:H6. This seemingly simple example is just to illustrate the context in which you will use this formula. A more likely scenario might include a long list of Salesforce member names defined by the range A1:A200, with last year’s sales results by product in B1:B200. If you want to know the total sales of all products by name, the formula would be:

=SUMIF(A1:A200,”Key Employee Name”,B1:B200).

This is a more likely use of the SUMIF formula. Once again, it is noted that the weaknesses of this formula reduce its overall usefulness. In simple database settings, this will work fine, but if you have a large database of information such as sales, profit, units sold and inventory, all by vendors, you’ll want to better understand the array formula entry that it will be. More flexible and easier to manipulate to deliver a variety of desired results.

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